Friday, December 1, 2023

The Hunter

 Back in the 'old days', when a deer was taken, we processed it ourselves. We used a hand meat saw and a small grinder. We washed the meat and wrapped the meat. It was a big job. 

Now that we only have one hunter in the family, he has been taking the deer to be processed. It's a lot easier. We also do not have the space in the kitchen here to do that any more. 

The problem is that, one by one, the deer processers have closed down. We have two left in the county. Tim dropped off his doe during archery, and that went alright, but now it is rifle season and there are a lot more hunters out there, and a lot more deer being taken. 

When Tim got his second doe, he was surprised to find that they were not accepting any more deer that day. Tim hung it and skinned it out. It was cold enough over night to keep the meat. He took it in the very first thing the next morning. They accepted it, but a few hours later, they had once again stopped accepting deer for the day. 

We had been talking about using a corner of the basement in the new house as a 'chop shop', setting it up with a professional meat grinder and a professional meat saw and stainless steel tables and sinks so that we can once again process our own meat (and much more efficiently than we did it in the old days.) 

Yesterday, Tim hunted down a stainless steel sink with stainless steel wings to mount on the side, so we went and picked that up today. 

Tonight he has hunted down a combination meat saw with a grinder too.  We are driving out to bring that home on Sunday, provided that everything is as the seller claims. 

He came out to tell me about it, and I said, "Wow. You're a good hunter!"

And he is. 


14 comments:

  1. You guys are simply amazing! You must have a huge freezer.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Butcher shops that process deer are harder to come by here as well. The main one nearest me usually has a month or so waiting time to get your processed meat back. Another one a little farther away, just weighs your deer and gives you the calculated weight back in meat already processed so you have limited say in how you can process it and you aren't getting back the deer you shot which can also lead to taste differences if one is used to eating younger does.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Here, there is a clear divide between butcher shops and deer processing. A deer cannot be taken to a butcher shop. Deer processing sites operate for archery, rifle, and muzzleloader season, then they shut down until next season.

      Delete
  3. Here the strict licensing and permits required would deter most people from contemplating butchering their own meat.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There are no regulations about processing your own meat. If we opened a business and began to processing deer for others, we would be subject to strict rules and regulations. We do intend to offer up the space and equipment to family to use to process their deer. I used to do food sanitation in the military and understand how to properly handle and clean the equipment.

      Delete
  4. Game birds and rabbits are about the limit here, and for reasons JayCee outlined.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I don't know what it is like here, but we do have an abundance of deer, one of which caused me car damage several years ago. The police don't even log a report anymore although they will record that there has been an incident.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is the same here. I hate driving in the evening at this time of the year.

      Delete
  6. Our closest and most-used deer processor here has stopped that part of their business. Glen had to take his last doe over to another county. But he and Vergil do grind the meat they want for hamburger with the help of the kids. And they vacuum seal it. Our almost-former son-in-law is a meat processor at a large grocery store here so when he was closer to the family, he helped Glen do their own deer.

    ReplyDelete
  7. It is a big job, esp. If you don't have the right equipment. The stuff that setup that Tim is putting together will make the job much easier.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Why d’you s’pose the deer processors are shutting down? If the demand is still there, seems like there’s still business to be done…

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think it is mostly that the owners of the businesses just age out and retire. Another problem is getting enough people in to do the work. They usually hire a batch of Amish. Tim will not use the other one because they froze the deer, unthawed it to cut it, and then refroze it. That is not proper meat handling. But we bought a new meatsaw/grinder. It was only $75 more than the used one. We decided the warranty made it worth it.

      Delete

I'm glad you're here!

Going, going, gone

 We finished the ceiling today. We have probably 1/2 of the drywall on the walls. We were able to take my sister and brother-in-law's dr...