Saturday, October 14, 2023

Saturday.

 Rainy Saturday here, cold, blustery. Sadly, the solar eclipse was not viewable due to the heavy cloud cover. Other than that, the weather didn't bother me.  We were working indoors. 

We got a late start. Our friend had a traffic accident this morning. Tim just happened to be passing by. The police were already there and he recognized Dick. It looked quite serious. Tim headed back to make sure that Dick did not need a ride home, but was surprised to see he was already gone. 

"I don't believe his car was driveable," Tim mused. 

But when we got to the Wayne St. house, sure enough. Dick's poor old car was sitting forlornly in the driveway. 

We knocked on the door, and Dick answered. "Want to buy a car?" he asked. 

"No," we said, "but Tim saw you and wanted to make sure you were okay." Tim said, "Boy. I did not think your car was driveable." Dick said, "Surprised me too." 

We visited for a few minutes. I had an apology to make. It is Dick who told Tim about the Proton Therapy, and made Tim wonder if perhaps there was a way to avoid the radical surgery. As Dick had tried to explain it to Tim, I could see that Tim was excited about the possibility. I walked away, not because I was angry, but because I was scared. I had asked a few questions about Dick's cancer and there was a lot that he didn't know. 

I explained my reaction and thankfully, Mary and Dick both understood. 

After visiting with them and petting their dog, we headed back over to the house and got to work hanging drywall. I was taking measurements and writing them on the wall, cutting drywall. and then together Tim and I would hang the glued sheet. He screwed it securely, while I went on to the next piece. We're a pretty good team when we are working together. When we see it differently, everything stops while we hash it out and that annoys both of us. Today was a good day though. 

As I worked, I thought about those numbers on the wall. In several of the old houses we've worked on, we've seen the measurements written on the wall. I always wondered about the hand that wrote them. I wondered if way far in the future, would there be someone studying my numbers? I wondered what their world would be like. I daydreamed as I worked steadily, and Tim quietly worked away at his end of the project. 

We came home shortly after 3, because Tim was anxious to get out and do some deer hunting. 

I cooked down the last of my tomatoes and made a nice goulash. I'm done with tomatoes. I've cooked down 2 1/2 bushels, turning them into stewed tomatoes, spaghetti sauce, and tomato soup. That's enough for two people. 

I grabbed 4 sets of sheets out of the dryer and made up the beds upstairs. I found Iris' little bat necklace that lights up. A pair of socks. Cara's sweatshirt. I put away the pack 'n play Ruby had slept in. I went from room to room, putting everything back together again, missing each one of them in turn. 

Outside the wind was howling around the eaves. I never noticed that it did that before. It certainly fit my mood though.



26 comments:

  1. I understand your worry and frustration about Tim and your future..
    I hope for you all that it’ll work out for the best ❤️ xo, Ricki

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  2. Oh, dear. I googled klismaphilia, as I love cloudy, rainy days. Not what I expected.

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  3. Lol. Okay then. Serves me right for not looking it up myself!

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  4. I was "bummed" out though, as I was excited to learn a new word! I can just hear myself casually mentioning my condition, while in line at the grocery store! Anne in Maryland

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    1. Oh, Anne. I was blissfully unaware of this.

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    2. I know. It's just someone having a laugh at our expense. I'll be thinking of you and Tim in the coming weeks. I know how hard it is to be in your situation. Anne in Maryland

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  5. I'd never heard of proton therapy. We don't offer that form of treatment in Canada, but it sounds interesting. The waiting is the hardest part.

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    1. It is hard. Interestingly enough, the therapy was developed by three men in Washington State. One of those men lives here. Tim is hopeful that Dr. K might be able to look over the scans and tell him whether he is a candidate or not. It would be nice if he is, but I don't want to get our hopes up.

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  6. Our tomato crop this year consisted of six ripe and a handful of stubbornly green ones still clinging to the vine. Yhey'll go to compost I think

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    1. Northsider will explain all. *waits expectantly*

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  7. Here is the description of proton beam therapy from NHS England.
    "Proton beam therapy
    Proton beam therapy is a type of radiotherapy that uses a beam of high energy protons, which are small parts of atoms, rather than high energy x-rays (called “photons”) to treat specific types of cancer.

    Proton beam therapy enables a dose of high energy protons to be precisely targeted at a tumour, reducing the damage to surrounding healthy tissues and vital organs which is an advantage in certain groups of patients or where the cancer is close to a critical part of the body such as the spinal cord.

    Proton beam therapy is only suitable for certain types of cancer, such as highly complex brain, head and neck cancers and sarcomas as it does not lead to better outcomes for many cancer cases than using high energy x-rays, which is still considered the most appropriate and effective treatment for the majority of cancers.

    Like high energy x-ray radiotherapy, proton beam therapy is painless, but patients may experience side effects similar to those experienced from other forms of radiotherapy."
    So another form of radiotherapy. Possibly Tim needs to read that quote?

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  8. Oh. He has. Although Dick insisted that it was not radiation, that was not my understanding. When we got home, I read up on it and we discussed it. He had been so hopeful that there was another way. I felt terrible for him.

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  9. You seem to be the calm voice of reason and reality.

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  10. whoo boy. Not calm. Thank goodness for my sister. She keeps me on a pretty even keel.

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  11. After the briefest of searches I see that photon therapy for prostate cancer is offered many places around here.

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    1. The question is whether Tim is a candidate for that treatment.

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  12. It's good to keep busy while you wait but I am sure it never leaves your mind. Glad you can vent to your sister.

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  13. Sounds like Halloween weather! So are you going to have another package of returned belongings to mail?

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  14. Yes. I found Ruby's favorite headband under the sofa, a sweater for Iris behind it, Brittani's socks in the front hall, an activity book. Two helium balloons bob forlornly around the livingroom, and make me a bit nostalgic when I see them. None of them will require priority mail though. Leo and Lovey were vitally important.

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  15. About 17 years ago my brother-in-law was diagnosed with prostate cancer. He was treated at the University of Washington hospital using the Da Vinci robot. he had an extremely good outcome, no incontinence or impotence, the surgery was laparoscopic with a short recovery time. He was back riding his bicycle in three weeks. The doctor went through the various non-surgical options, but at the end of the appointment he made it clear that the safest option was to take out the prostate before the cancer spread. Until his death from Alzheimer's in 2017 he remained cancer free. I wish you the best, but please decide and soon, time is not on your side here.

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  16. I know. That is what makes me anxious.

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  17. I usually leave a note written on the back of something during a home remodel project simply because I've always enjoyed reading what I have found during demolition of other projects, even if they were just measurement numbers.

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  18. I've been gone a while. So much is going on with your lives. I feel your worry. It's hard.

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I'm glad you're here!

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