Monday, August 21, 2023

Tim and I Entertain

 I have been struggling lately with that brain that whirrs off and keeps me up until o'dark-thirty. Last night was another one of those nights. I did fall asleep eventually, and when I did, I slept like a rock. 

I was horrified to wake up and discover it was 9 am. Tim was already gone down the street to the new roof and I did not hear a thing. I didn't want him down there alone. I drank my coffee and ate my 4 McVities and got myself dressed, teeth brushed and headed down the street to help Tim. 

On the way, I met a man who lives across the street from that house. "Going down to supervise Tim, are you?"

"No," I answered. "I'm going down to help."

So I got there just in time to load the old shingles on to the truck. Tim moved the truck and pointed to the 4 x 8 plywood sheets and said, "Push them up the ladder to me." 

I said, "I thought you were cutting them." 

He said, "I am. I will cut them on the roof." 

I firmly said, "No. You will not. They are big and they are unwieldy and you're making us work way harder than we need to. They'll get cut on the ground and the smaller pieces carried up to the roof. That's safer."

He snorted. "It's not any safer." 

I put my foot down. "I'm not doing it like that, and neither are you." And I waited. 

He huffed and he puffed and I just looked back at him. "Fine!" he said. "We're cutting them on the ground." 

And so we did. 

He didn't have a pencil. I walked back down the street to get one. By then the guy across the street was sitting on his porch. "Going home for lunch, are you?" 

I was hot and sweaty and I had just had yet another unneccessary argument with my husband. I looked at him and said, "No. I need to grab a pencil." I walked home and grabbed four of them to stick in both trucks. I walked back. 

Tim was still pissy, but I didn't care. I have a very bad knee and standing of unlevel surfaces is always a bit scary for me. My knee suddenly gives out. Hauling heavy stuff on a slant made that possibility even more likely. I handed him a pencil. 

He cut the pieces of wood, and then I hauled them up the ladder and across the roof to him where he was up on the high roof hammering away. 

"Get me my roofing nailer," he said. 

He was still mad. I still didn't care. 

"Where is it?" I asked. 

"In the truck," he answered.

"The big truck or the small truck?" 

"The dump truck." 

And so I headed to the dump truck which was parked on the street. By that time, in a passing way, I noticed that the man across the street had been joined by his wife. I opened the door to the dump truck, and lo the roofing nailer was not there. As I looked behind the seats, I became aware of yelling behind me. I didn't really attend, because the couple fights. 

(Yes, I am fully aware that I'm the pot calling the kettle black.)

In any case, I was putting the seat back in place and I heard "Hell-ooooooooooooo! HELLLLL-OOOOOOOO!!!!!!!" in a demanding sort of a way. I turned around. The man said, "Yeah! I'm talking to you!" 

Did I mention that I was hot and tired, and not having the best of days? I feel like that's important to this story.

Summoning all my patience, I said, "Yes?" 

"WHAT'S YOUR NAME ANYWAY???!!!!

(Are you freaking KIDDING me?) Politely, I said, 'Debby' and headed back across the street. I called up to the roof, "Tim. It is not in the dump truck. Did you bring it up from Grand Valley?" 

"Then it is in the other truck," he said. 

I looked in the other truck and there it was. That's my main job, I swear. Finding the things that he sets down and forgets where. He's got a lot of places to set stuff down. Sometimes those places are at different houses. 

(At one point, he was yelling, "Where's my tin snips?" I said, "Well, you had them in your hand." He said, "Did I?" I said. "Yes, Tim, you did." I checked both trucks. I checked the ground where we were working. No tin snips. I found them. They were on the roof, resting right there on the peak of the first story side of the house. I said, "For pete's sake!" and pointed them out. "Huh." said Tim.)

But I digress. I hauled the roofing nailer up the ladder like I hadn't been dragging lost stuff up the ladder all day and handed it to him on the high roof. Did I mention that I'm afraid of heights? I feel like this is important to the story too. But there was not much of a choice here. I know I shouldn't be on the roof, but I also know that Tim probably shouldn't be either. 

"Grab that roll of ice and water shield and bring it up." 

I went down to grab the roll and it was heavy. Really heavy. 

I struggled it over to the ladder and started trying to get it up the ladder. I said, "I'm not quite sure how the **** you think that is going to happen." 

"Just hold on, then," he said in a voice that was as grumpy as my own.

Between the two of us, we wrestled it up on the roof. We got done what we needed to get done. I even got myself on the second story roof. It was sickening, but I did it. Out of the corner of my eye, I see the neighbors across the street. Apparently, they'd gone out some place. They were coming back and stopped their car in the street to watch us. 

When I am really scared, it comes out as mad sometimes. I feel like that is another important detail to the story. "Gees," I snapped, "What in THE hell is their problem?" 

Today we got the underlayment down and the drip edge installed. We got the ice and water shield and the felt paper down. 

Most importantly, we seem to have provided great entertainment to the couple across the street. 

Oh. And you have received the sanitized, fit to be retold version of the day's events. That may be important to the story too. 


39 comments:

  1. You two need to hire some help for this dangerous stuff. Yep, you can argue about it. I hope the people across the street from your new house become a little friendlier, or may help? Linda in Kansas

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    1. Nooooooooo....they are older than we are and drinkers. Tim hired their son once. He worked 'til noon, asked for cash and never came back.

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  2. I know how hard it is to work with a husband, we remodeled almost every house we lived in. The first one was old enough it had a pitcher pump in the kitchen sink. We stripped it to the studs and started over. It was two story, and we added a tin roof. The steps were so steep and off size that I fell down them trying to carry a chair. My husband always assumed if he could life it I should. It was not always smooth but now I only remember the good times, Hang in there Debby. Winter will come and you will be working inside probably ground level.

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  3. You do need help. This is pushing you both too far xx

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  4. Tim is a bit of a hard taskmaster I think. Never having gone in for housebuilding, it is more difficult in England but I love the determined way you two are tackling this enormous job.

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    1. He's anxious right now and trying not to be. He yells a lot more than he usually does. Yesterday, I swore more than I usually do.

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  5. Sounds like me trying to help P.
    You will both need a relaxing holiday soon.

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    1. It's like live slapstick comedy...with heights.

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  6. To put it politely you two are barking mad to be doing a roof when you are scared of heights with a gammy knee in addition to all the other potential and real things involved.

    PS Was there a message from Amazon waiting when you got home?

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    1. There was. It denied my claim. I appealed based on the fact that the company involved was using Amazon's 30 day return policy to avoid their warranty responsibility. There is a week wait to see what they think about that.

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  7. I'm guessing you left out a whole lot of cussing!! Lordy - let this be the last house you decide to build together - for the sake of your sanity and your projected hospital bills!! I take my hat off to you overcoming your fear of heights and going up on the roof like that. Well done.

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    1. Tim did say last night, "We probably should do a roof every year to keep ourselves in shape." I said, "This is the last roof we ever do." The good news is that the houses now all have good roofs.

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  8. Wow, gotta give you credit! There's some sh**t I will not do, and ladders and roofs are one of them. I know it saves money, but the thought of a fall or other injury gives me such anxiety! We gutted and redid the interior of our home years ago, and we had the help of a contractor. It was so much work I am never doing it again. Ever. I won't even crack open a can of paint. Just. No.

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    1. The problem here is that you cannot find the people to do it. Big contracting companies want the big jobs (and dollars). Smaller outfits want the small jobs and lots of them (also for the dollars). Finding a good contractor between the two is nearly impossible. It never has been about money.

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  9. I think you should have gone round with a collection bucket for contributions for the entertainment.

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  10. I have the opposite problem. I fall asleep easily but wake up in the wee hours of the morning and then my brain fires up. I would rather have your problem I think.

    I also am a bit different in the spousal argument department. If I were to disagree with my wife, she just absolutely shuts down and goes into silent mode. I would rather she yell back at me and then keep going.

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  11. I have read the comments, which I usually don't do, and although I've read what you have said about contractor difficulties, I agree that it is time to slow down. As I have said before, very few women would do what you do, and I think you should really think hard about stopping now, or close to stopping anyway.

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  12. Oh my. This is why many couples avoid doing major projects together, I guess! I hope things get MUCH easier once you get this roof done. I'm so impressed you're doing this work at all.

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  13. Debby. I just don't know what to say. I SO wish that Time had someone else to help him because I have a feeling he's not going to stop doing what he's doing.

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  14. I couldn't do any of that, Debby. You and Tim are taking such risks.

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    1. Not much of a choice at this point. Tim is doing the lion's share.

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  15. Thinking further, please be careful. You are in potentially dangerous situations, and irritations are distracting.

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    1. Esp. If you are feeling a bit...er...testy.

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  16. Back in the early 80's my husband and I built a house together. We did have it some of it contracted out, such as footings, basement and the rough framing, but then did 80% of the rest ourselves. My moment of truth was when we rented the equipment to blow cellulose insulation into the walls and attic. My job was to cut open the bales of cellulose (probably 50# each), lift and dump them into the hopper/blower. I was told absolutely never to let the hopper go empty, because the free air in the chute would blow away whatever he had spread in the attic. So, cut, lift, dump, shake, pitch, cut, lift, etc. Finally, I stopped after 20 or 30 bales and was chastised for slacking off. I walked off the job in tears of exhaustion.

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    1. Ugh. I feel ya sistah! That is my job too. A miserable one. The last time we did it, there was a problem with the machine. It was taken in by the shop, and the returned the following day, fixed. It malfunctioned again. Tim ripped apart and discovered the previous user had dropped an 8 inch knife into the works. A job we had slated a half day for took 2+ days. But the worst part was that Tim was sure that it was something I was not doing properly.

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  17. Just saying......I totally get the dynamic with Tim as I am Married to a "Tim" but re the neighbours YOU ARE A SAINT!

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    1. Do saints swear? Pretty sure they do not. Ergo...

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  18. Debby....just , no. You could not help Tim if you were dead and that is where I am going with this- paralyzed would be worse...hang up your gear, girl.

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  19. Dear Tim, I in no way wish to be impertinent, but can I please draw your attention to two small factors.
    Your lovely wife Debby has a bung knee. Now, as the spouse of someone who has two technologically-wondrous new knees, please heed my "do not get your afeared-of-heights bung-kneed beautiful wife to climb up and down a ladder - or even stairs - multiple times during any given day" advice. The repercussions of waiting too long on the rest of my husband's body are not pleasant.
    Secondly, you yourself had quite a health scare earlier this year and we are all so very glad that you are back to being as bouncy as a bucket of rubber balls. We do realise that part of this riding roughshod over common sense to do it all yourself is because you may not feel there is enough time. And another part of it is proving that you still have the skills and aptitude. But after we say a hearty congratulations to you, may we please say that you have to measure twice and cut once on trying to do it all. Play smart with your own and your beautiful wife's health and enjoy the fruits for as long as you can.
    Your humble servant,
    Etc.
    Dear Debby, please see an orthopaedic surgeon. The medal for putting up with it is not worth it.
    As above
    J

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    1. But yes, now having read the comments, I hear you on contractors. V is having the same problem - only he doesn't a compliant enough wife (who wouldn't have the time were she compliant).

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