Thursday, April 6, 2023

Mattie

I drove Mattie to Erie today, a little over an hour away. As usual, we found a lot to talk about. She had never been to the place we were going to and neither had I. I relied solely on the GPS and ended up in very unfamiliar territory. I kept my misgivings to myself, but continued following the directions. Happily, we ended up right where we wanted to be, but it was a bit of a puzzle to me, because looking out across Lake Erie, I knew right where we were. I also knew that I'd have come a whole 'nuther way. 

"We're taking the route home that I know," I said. She placidly said, "You're the driver." 

I'd brought my latest Britain magazine and was set to read in the car, but much to my surprise, she said, "I don't know this place. I didn't want to come by myself. Levi said that you'd probably come with me." 

"Of course I will." And I gathered up my magazine and we went in. We found our way. 

On the way home, I told her the joke that I'd played on Tim. Tim has been chomping at the bit about the new house. Now that he's got the excavator and the concrete crew to pour the basement, he is anxious to dot all his i's and cross all his t's. Saturday afternoon, after our big storm, when our power was still out, while we were watching other smaller storms rolling in and back out, Tim took it in his head to go up and ask Levi a question. It wasn't a pressing question. It could have waited. Downed trees everywhere. They live at the top of a mountain, on a dirt road that is slick when it is muddy. 

I was trying to discourage him from going without saying, "You are NOT going and that's final." So I said, "Don't be ridiculous. Our power's out. I'm sure that theirs will be out too." 

It took Tim  15 seconds or so before he caught my  joke. Levi and Mattie are Amish. They don't have electricity. 


Mattie laughed. She told me her joke. When the bus driver dropped off the children on Wednesday, the bus driver told Mattie she was headed home before the predicted big storm hit. (You know, the one that didn't hit?) She was going to run a bathtub full of water and fill jugs. She was going to make sure that she knew where he lanterns were and that her flashlights were ready. She was not going to be taken by surprise in case of another power outage. 

Mattie listened and said, "You lost power at your house? That's strange. We never lost power here."

The driver looked surprised. Like I said earlier, they live at the top of a moutain, and however fierce our wind was in town, it was worse up there. The bus driver stared. It took her a few seconds to get the joke as well. They never lost power because they never had it to begin with.

I laughed. Mattie laughed. 

Just funny that we both have the same sense of humor. 




14 comments:

  1. I got confused, so I must be worrying about the folks at the top of the mountain. Linda in Kansas

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    Replies
    1. Mattie and Levi live at the top of a mountain. They are Amish. They don't have electricity.

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    2. Ok, thanks. The Amish around Kansas seem to have electricity. No big mountains in Kansas to get zapped on. Linda

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    3. I am willing to bet that your Amish are actually Mennonite.

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  2. Nice gentle joking..and making people think!

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  3. Life is better with a sense of humour.

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  4. It just dawned on me that you reference Lake Erie. I am sure that you have always referenced it, but in my tiny brain I substituted Lake Ontario.

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  5. I have had a few people over the years complain that their "GPS" would get them lost or take them wrong ways. In every case, they always had their setting set so that it avoided major highways or took the shortest way possible by default, etc. Ours generally always displays 3 different routes following three different sets of criteria and once you know what they are, it is fairly easy to choose your route ahead of time and not be surprised by where it takes you.

    Living among Amish, I get sent a lot of Amish memes, including many about their lack of power. But I can see how easily it might be for someone not to catch on quickly if they aren't around them daily.

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  6. I am always baffled as to why it is considered okay for Mattie to ride in your car while eschewing motor vehicles of her family's own. Religions have very odd rules that I frequently do not understand.

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    Replies
    1. I just figure that I am not Amish, so it doesn't need to make sense to me. In a lot of the cases, it has to do with medical situations.

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    2. At least here, and every Amish sect is different, they could only accept rides from English (everyone else) for emergencies, work related, or vacations while the nearest town had a functioning lumberyard and grocery store. When those closed up in the late 80's, they became much more liberal accepting rides due to the nearest grocery store being 30 miles away.

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  7. Funny! It must be so interesting to straddle these worlds, the Amish and your own.

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  8. You both have a wonderful sense of humor and I love it. Sounds like you had a nice trip and hope you have a great weekend.

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I'm glad you're here!

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