Thursday, January 12, 2023

Egg-asperating

 I have watched the price of eggs go up, but they've been holding pretty steady at $4.11 a dozen. Imagine my surprise to make a quick stop into Aldi and see that in less than a week, the price had gone up 88 cents, to $4.99. 

Tim and I gawked.

Now, Ms. Moon mentioned that eggs were $6.00 a dozen in her neck of the woods. That was a shock. 50 cents an egg, so I guess that I don't really have anything to really complain about. 

Except...two glass doors down from the $4.99 every day white eggs, there were the 'fancy' eggs. Brown eggs. The pasture raised, free range eggs. The pricey stuff. They were $4.19 a dozen.

What are a dozen eggs running for in your corner of the world?

56 comments:

  1. I have no idea. But we mainly get ours from a hobby farmer who sells eggs on the side. Even if I bought it in a grocery store, I still wouldn't know as I never look at prices. I prefer the shock of seeing the total all at once.

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    1. Why settle for heart palpitations when you can go for a full cardiac arrest...

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  2. The last eggs I got were from Costco- a big warehouse type store. I got 18 beautiful blue-green eggs, supposedly cage-free, for six dollars, I think. Far better price.

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    1. I guess I misunderstood. I assumed a dozen.

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  3. Same as you, Debby. $4.99. We have friends that are chicken ranchers and they have become even better friends in the past few months.

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    1. Shrewd. Maybe your next friends should own cows?

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  4. Drats! I just bought a dozen 'Jumbo' eggs yesterday and tossed the receipt (after going into shock over the price I paid for a frozen pizza, $8.99). After reading this I'm almost afraid to know :^(

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    1. Douglas! You should have anticipated my question. But cripes! $9.00 for a pizza? We are making pizzas from scratch. I will have to break it down, but I am going to guess it is about half that.

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  5. Two weeks ago, I paid $5.50 for a dozen large in a metro, local chain store, Hy-Vee grocery, in the Kansas-side suburb of Kansas City. Might have to switch to golden goose or ostrich eggs. Avian flu is probably worse to get than the price increase. Some egg farmers have totally enclosed huge warehouses to prevent wild birds from getting in and spreading avian flu. Linda in Kansas

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    1. Lol at the golden egg. I guess that I didn't realize avian flu couldinfect humans. Off to read up on this

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  6. Cage eggs, cheapest and bad practice.
    Barn eggs, dearer and better practice.
    Free range eggs, dearer still and best practice.
    Organic eggs, expensive and I don't know about them.

    We buy 700g (25 oz) free range eggs at Aldi and they have risen by about $1 over the last year. Converting what we pay to your money, close to US$6.50. That may sound expensive but over the past couple of decades of blogging, I've learnt that such raw comparisons are quite pointless.

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    1. It has to be weighed against income. I know that we won't be eating eggs. I will use them in baking and stuff but...

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  7. Here in Florence, SC, the prices are about the same as you mention here. I wish I could keep some hens! (Actually, I take that back. There are too many animals sharing space with me as it is!)

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    1. I wish! I'd be rich and leading a life of leisure by now if they did!

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  8. Funny you should ask. About an hour ago, Wife told me she paid 6.99 for a dozen and she was flabbergasted.

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  9. I just paid $7.00 for a dozen- Petaluma (used to be the egg capital of the world!),California.

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  10. Hi Debby I paid $4.90 Australian for a dozen free range eggs extra large size. Just from local large supermarket chain. You can pay a lot more if you buy from organic farm gate or similar. All costs are rising here in southern Victoria, You have to shop around to make ends meet

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    1. All over the world I think. It's esp. critical when you live in a part of the world where minimum wage is $7.25. I don't know how those folks manage.

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  11. Between 5 and 8 $nz at the moment for decent free range eggs....that's for six.....
    The fault is not bird flu...a few years ago, the government said that the farmers had so many years to convert to free range....but it seems that many haven't...and now in the scramble (ha!) to get all the planning and building done, there are of course delays....and because of covid and everything else happening, building material prices and other costs have risen.....so eggs are in short supply and expensive.
    Back in Britain, my youngest son's allotment chooks have been confined to quarters for a long time, due to Avian Flu being around, so are rather sulky and egg laying has been slow...but gradually increasing with increased daylight

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    1. My niece had half her chicken flock taken out by a fox attack. I do plan on having chickens when we actually move to the retirement property, but we can't even think about it until someone is physically down there. I think just 3 or 4 of them. We don't need a huge amount of eggs.

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  12. $2.99 at my local Albertsons. Or free if I talk to my chicken owning friends.

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    1. Oh, I'd hie myself right over to talk to your chicken owning friends! Quite a surprise that you can still get eggs at that price, though.

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  13. They're getting expensive here too - that's if you can find a shop with eggs in stock.

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    1. Stock doesn't seem to be an issue here. Not yet.

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  14. Our hens are laying 9 eggs a day at the moment. Layers Mash is very expensive and other animal feeds are very expensive at the moment.

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    1. https://www.aussiechooksupplies.com.au/blog/information-blogs/how-to-make-a-healthy-mash-for-your-flock/#:~:text=As%20it%20has%20no%20specific,from%20your%20fridge%20or%20cupboard. You sent me off a hunt!

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  15. Gosh, that's dear for eggs. Here it depends on size (medium or large), whether freerange or not and whether organic or not. The cheapest ones would be from Lidl or Aldi, battery hen eggs (which I never buy - used to have my own hens, free range) - they're about £1.69 for 10. ($2.07) Here's a link to the priciest - Waitrose is an expensive shop) eggs, all sorts of good 'uns available: https://www.waitrose.com/ecom/shop/browse/groceries/fresh_and_chilled/milk_butter_and_eggs/free_range_eggs

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    1. That price was for the eggs that are normally the cheapest. I guess that you would call the the battery eggs. A friend commented that he bought a dozen eggs, a loaf of bread and a gallon of milk and spent nearly $15. I guess since I buy my groceries all at once, I haven't paid much attention.

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  16. As there have not been any eggs in any of the supermarkets I have visited in the last three weeks I am afraid I cannot tell you the price. Portia, England.

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    1. That is not anything we've muchm dealt with at this point. I notice that not all pastas are available. The other day, I heard someone complaining that the only tissues available were generic. "It's getting awfully hard for people who are simply trying to survive."

      I thought this was one of the funniest things I've ever heard. Imagine tying your survival to the availability of name brand tissues!

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  17. I buy from roadside stalls - several around and pay £1 for half a dozen. Here brown eggs are preferred and white shelled rarely seen - they are all the same inside and the shell depends on the breed

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    1. We prefer to do that. We have to find a new source though, due to an unhappy fox attack.

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  18. I don’t always pay attention to price or don’t remember if I do, so I looked it up. At my grocery store, they sell for as little as $3:59 but they are medium. I would probably get the brown, free run, large, and they are $6.59.

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    1. That's 50 cents an egg. Boggles my mind. Really.

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  19. I still haven't checked, but on the way home from work I'll pop into the store and have a look!

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    1. Or should I say 'egg-cetera, egg-cetera'? Oh, I crack myself up. That's a good yolk.

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  20. Our egg prices have fluctuated in the last few months. I believe I paid $4.88 (Canadian)for 18 eggs last week.

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  21. That isn't too bad. I actually had to run to the store today to get mozzarella cheese. We're making up a batch of home made pizzas tonight. We saw a case of 60 eggs for $19.82. We did buy them (and felt quite ridiculous doing so. I dated the box. I believe that quantity of eggs will last us until April. It will be interesting to see.

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  22. Tucson, AZ went months without any eggs available. Local blogger reported that. We're in Tucson now, and have seen the price range between $7 and $10 for a dozen. Since we're in a rented condo with ruined non-stick skillets, we will not be eating eggs at all. Oddly enough when we left Spokane, WA, eggs were $2 a dozen.

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  23. Looking at our local supermarket chain, for bog standard extra-large barn eggs $4.30 ($3.00 US) - there is free-range and there is free-range - for a more ethical free-range, you pay 5.90 ($4.12 US) to over 8.50 ($5.93 US). This is when they are available - we haven't Avian Flu here, but we have floods and they can affect things. When I visit Dad, eggs are free.

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  24. I rarely buy eggs since I'm plant-based, so I don't know what they are in the store... but I know my daughter gets hers from a work acquaintance with chickens. A dozen for $3.00 or 18 for $4.00. She said they taste better than store-bought eggs, too.

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    1. Sorry... I forgot to sign in again. 🙄

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    2. As soon as I read your first line, I knew it was you!

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  25. In paris : 6 (6! not 12!) organic, free range eggs = 3,50 euros = 3,80 USD . The battery farmed ones are about 2/3 the price, but ... chickens are so smart and curious, I'd rather pay the premium and treat an egg as a luxury item even though "free range" here still means a pretty crowded barn and who knows what "organic" means - but you don't seem to be able to get one without the other here. My mum in the UK gets eggs - 6 for a pound (1.2 USD) from a box outside a house in the village where she lives (i.e. honour system, take the eggs, drop a coin in the box)... Lots of people keep their own chickens there - and some are very free range - one keeps on crossing the road to go to the pub ! I assume they bring it in at night cos there are lots of foxes there too. Don't know if they have been vaccinated against salmonella though, so no runny eggs when I go visit. Cat.

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    1. I love to get my eggs straight from the farm. Unfortunately, here, cash boxes are stolen. A local farmer actually installed the box into the wall. The thieves ripped the box right out of the wall!

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  26. Yup. I've seen $6.00 too. A lot depends on if it's local (Hawaii) eggs or mainland eggs. Funny thing is mainland eggs are often more expensive.

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    1. It seems as if local eggs would be higher because they would not be as commonplace. That's interesting.

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  27. In the UK I'm paying anything between $2.81 and $4.28 for 6- SIX
    if and when I can get them. Most often they aren't available - I don't take the cheapest eggs (about $2 for 6) because thankfully I can manage to pay more so I leave them for those who can't. Thanks for a very interesting blog - find your cat tales remind me of the time I took on a litter of feral cats with mum - they finally settled after about 9 months with us, loved them for about 15 to 20 years. Miss them. Elaine

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  28. Here in NZ I live 3.5 miles or 1.6 miles from two egg "farms". I was paying $9 for 30 eggs (Jan 2022), then $10 (April 2022), then $11 in November, and just before Christmas $15. I understand it's now $15 for 25 eggs. The same producer's eggs sell in the supermarket for 12 at $9.49.

    There is quite a supply issue at present due to the changes gz mentioned above. The government introduced rules to remove battery egg farming, but retained cage (75cm² per hen for a max of I think 60 hens per "cage"). Our two major supermarket chains unilaterally decided they would no longer accept caged eggs. Lots of suppliers left the market as the cost to change to barn/free range prohibitive. Apparently it will take 18+ months to get laying stock up to previous capacity, even if the suppliers decide to change.

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